References

Epitools methodology

Brown LD, Cat TT, DasGupta A, 2001. Interval Estimation for a proportion. Statistical Science 16: 101-133.

Cameron AR, and Baldock FC, 1998. A new probability formula for surveys to substantiate freedom from disease. Prev. Vet. Med. 34: 1-17.

Cameron AR, 1999. Survey Toolbox for Livestock Diseases - A practical manual and software package for active surveillance of livestock diseases in developing countries. Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research, Canberra, Australia.

Cicchetti DV, Feinstein AR, 1990. High agreement but low kappa: II. Resolving the paradoxes. J. Clin. Epidemiol. 43: 551-558.

Gardner IA, 2000. Application of diagnostic tests in epidemiologic studies. Prev. Vet. Med. 45: 43-59.

Gardner IA, Stryhn H, Lind P, Collins MT, 2000. Conditional dependence between tests affects the diagnosis and surveillance of animal diseases. Prev. Vet. Med. 45: 107-122.

Greiner M, Pfeiffer D and Smith RD, 2000. Principles and practical application of the receiver-operating characteristic analysis for diagmostic tests. Prev. Vet. Med. 45: 23-41.

Humphry RW, Cameron A, Gunn GJ, 2004. A practical approach to calculate sample size for herd prevalence surveys. Prev. Vet. Med. 65: 173-188.

Jordan D, McEwen SA, 1998. Herd-level test performance based on uncertain estimates of individual test performance, individual true prevalence and herd true prevalence. Prev. Vet. Med. 3: 187-209.

Joseph L, Gyorkos TW, Coupal L, 1995. Bayesian estimation of disease prevalence and the parameters of diagnostic tests in the absence of a gold standard. Am. J. Epidemiol. 141: 263-272.

MacDiarmid SC, 1988. NZ Vet. J. 36: 39-42.

Martin et el. 1992. Prev. Vet. Med. 14: 33-43.

Reiczigel, Földi and Òzsvári (2010). Exact confidence limits for prevalence of a disease with an imperfect diagnostic test, Epidemiology and Infection 138:1674-1678.

Richards MS, 1983. Proceedings of the 3rd International Symposium on Veterinary Epidemiology and Economics, pp 567-570.

Rogan and Gladen 1978. Estimating prevalence from the results of a screening test. Am. J. Epidemiol. 107: 71-76.

Suess EA, Gardner IA, Johnson WO, 2002. Hierarchical Bayesian model for prevalence inferences and determination of a country's status for an animal pathogen. Prev. Vet. Med. 55: 155-171.

Thrusfield M, 1996. Veterinary Epidemiology. 2nd Edition. Blackwell Science, Oxford, UK.

Vose D, 2000. Risk Analysis - A quantitative guide. 2nd edition. John Wiley and Sons Ltd., Chichester, England.

Epitools applications

European Food Safety authority, 2009. Porcine brucellosis(Brucella suis). Scientific opinion of the Panel on animal Health and Welfare. The EFSA Juournal 1144: 1-112.

Curran, JM, 2012. The surveillance and risk assessment of wild birds in northern Australia for highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 virus. PhD thesis, Murdoch University. Available at: http://researchrepository.murdoch.edu.au/8587/.

Nielsen, LR, 2012. Salmonella Dublin in cattle: Epidemiology, design and evaluation of surveillance and eradication programmes. Dr. med. vet. thesis. Department of Large Animal Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. Available at: https://dl.dropbox.com/u/13522390/Doctoral%20thesis%20Liza%20Part%201%2013082012%201-sidigt%20format.pdf

Andreassen A, et al., 2012. Prevalence of tick borne encephalitis virus in tick nymphs in relation to climatic factors on the southern coast of Norway. Parasites & Vectors 5:177

Pooled prevalence methodology

Cowling DW, Gardner IA, Johnson WO, 1999. Comparison of methods for estimation of individual-level prevalence based on pooled samples. Prev. Vet. Med. 39: 211-25.

Joseph L, Gyorkos TW, Coupal L, 1995. Bayesian estimation of disease prevalence and the parameters of diagnostic tests in the absence of a gold standard. Am. J. Epidemiol. 141: 263-272.

Mendoza-Blanco JR, Tu XM, Iyengar S, 1996. Bayesian inference on prevalence using a missing-data approach with simulation-based techniques: applications to HIV screening. Stat. Med. 15: 2161-2176.

Messam LLMcV, Branscum AJ, Collins MT, Gardner IA, 2008. Frequentist and Bayesian approaches to prevalence estimation using examples from Johne's disease. Animal Health Research Reviews 9: 1-23.

Sacks JM, Bolin S, Crowder SV, 1989. Prevalence estimation from pooled samples. Am. J. Vet. Res. 50: 205-206.

Suess EA, Gardner IA, Johnson WO, 2002. Hierarchical Bayesian model for prevalence inferences and determination of a country's status for an animal pathogen. Prev. Vet. Med. 55: 155-171.

Vose D, 2000. Risk Analysis - A quantitative guide. 2nd edition. John Wiley and Sons Ltd., Chichester, England.

Williams CJ, Moffitt CM, 2001. A critique of methods of sampling and reporting pathogens in populations of fish. Journal of Aquatic Animal Health 13: 300-309.

Worlund DD, Taylor G, 1983. Estimation of disease incidence in fish populations. Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences 40: 2194-2197.

Pooled prevalence applications

Dhand NK, Eppleston J, Whittington RJ, Toribio JA, 2007. Risk factors for ovine Johne's disease in infected sheep flocks in Australia. Prev. Vet. Med. 82: 51-71.

Messam LLMcV, Branscum AJ, Collins MT, Gardner IA, 2008. Frequentist and Bayesian approaches to prevalence estimation using examples from Johne's disease. Animal Health Research Reviews 9: 1-23.

Reddacliff L, Eppleston J, Windsor P, Whittington R, Jones S, 2006. Efficacy of a killed vaccine for the control of paratuberculosis in Australian sheep flocks. Vet. Microbiol. 115: 77-90.

Toribio J-ALML, Sergeant ESG, 2007. A comparison of methods to estimate the prevalence of ovine Johne's disease infection from pooled faecal samples. Aust. Vet. J. 85: 317-324.


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